Have you noticed a bony protrusion on the side of your big toe? If so, you may have developed the foot condition known as a bunion. Don't let bunions interfere with your daily activities.

Pain in the ball of the foot, medically referred to as metatarsalgia, can stem from injuries, neuromas, and ill-fitting footwear. Common among athletes and high heel wearers, this pain often results from improper weight distribution across the metatarsal bones. Pain in the ball of the foot also may be the result of Morton’s neuroma, where nerve tissue in the ball of the foot becomes swollen. Foot injuries such as fractures, gout, arthritis, and bunions can also contribute to this metatarsal pain. High heels, in particular, tend to compress the toes and place excessive pressure on the ball of the foot, making matters worse. Persistent pressure or friction from tight shoes can cause calluses that add to the pain. Proper footwear with ample room for the toes and cushioning around the ball of the foot is essential for preventing and managing pain. If you are experiencing pain in the ball of your foot, it is suggested that you make an appointment with a podiatrist for an exam and treatment.

Foot Pain

Foot pain can be extremely painful and debilitating. If you have a foot pain, consult with Dr. Christine Quinn from New Jersey. Our doctor will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment.

Causes

Foot pain is a very broad condition that could be caused by one or more ailments. The most common include:

  • Bunions
  • Hammertoes
  • Plantar Fasciitis
  • Bone Spurs
  • Corns
  • Tarsal Tunnel Syndrome
  • Ingrown Toenails
  • Arthritis (such as Gout, Rheumatoid, and Osteoarthritis)
  • Flat Feet
  • Injury (from stress fractures, broken toe, foot, ankle, Achilles tendon ruptures, and sprains)
  • And more

Diagnosis

To figure out the cause of foot pain, podiatrists utilize several different methods. This can range from simple visual inspections and sensation tests to X-rays and MRI scans. Prior medical history, family medical history, and any recent physical traumatic events will all be taken into consideration for a proper diagnosis.

Treatment

Treatment depends upon the cause of the foot pain. Whether it is resting, staying off the foot, or having surgery; podiatrists have a number of treatment options available for foot pain.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Basking Ridge, NJ, near Warren, Stirling, and Bedminster . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

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Diabetic nerve pain in the feet, also known as diabetic neuropathy, is a common and often debilitating complication of diabetes. This condition arises when prolonged high blood sugar levels cause damage to the nerves. Symptoms can include numbness, and tingling, in addition to burning, sharp, or aching pain. Initially mild, this discomfort can intensify and spread, severely limiting mobility and reducing quality of life. Walking can become a challenge, and even the lightest touch may feel excruciating. About half of diabetic patients will experience some form of neuropathy. A significant portion will suffer from pain that can interfere with sleep and daily activities, contributing to emotional distress. Managing blood sugar levels is essential in preventing the progression of nerve damage. A balanced diet, regular exercise, and prescribed medications can help maintain healthy blood sugar levels. Additionally, addressing other health risks like obesity and smoking can also play a vital role in controlling diabetes and its complications. If you are experiencing diabetic foot pain, it is suggested that you schedule an appointment with a podiatrist for an exam and treatment options. 

Neuropathy

Neuropathy can be a potentially serious condition, especially if it is left undiagnosed. If you have any concerns that you may be experiencing nerve loss in your feet, consult with Dr. Christine Quinn from New Jersey. Our doctor will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment for neuropathy.

What Is Neuropathy?

Neuropathy is a condition that leads to damage to the nerves in the body. Peripheral neuropathy, or neuropathy that affects your peripheral nervous system, usually occurs in the feet. Neuropathy can be triggered by a number of different causes. Such causes include diabetes, infections, cancers, disorders, and toxic substances.

Symptoms of Neuropathy Include:

  • Numbness
  • Sensation loss
  • Prickling and tingling sensations
  • Throbbing, freezing, burning pains
  • Muscle weakness

Those with diabetes are at serious risk due to being unable to feel an ulcer on their feet. Diabetics usually also suffer from poor blood circulation. This can lead to the wound not healing, infections occurring, and the limb may have to be amputated.

Treatment

To treat neuropathy in the foot, podiatrists will first diagnose the cause of the neuropathy. Figuring out the underlying cause of the neuropathy will allow the podiatrist to prescribe the best treatment, whether it be caused by diabetes, toxic substance exposure, infection, etc. If the nerve has not died, then it’s possible that sensation may be able to return to the foot.

Pain medication may be issued for pain. Electrical nerve stimulation can be used to stimulate nerves. If the neuropathy is caused from pressure on the nerves, then surgery may be necessary.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Basking Ridge, NJ, near Warren, Stirling, and Bedminster . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

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Post-traumatic wounds over the top part of the foot are injuries that occur after a traumatic event, such as an accident or severe impact. These wounds can be caused by cuts, crush injuries, or severe abrasions. When they happen, it is essential to treat them properly to prevent complications like infection or poor healing. Handling these wounds involves cleaning and dressing them to prevent infection. In more severe cases, where the skin and tissue are significantly damaged, podiatrists may use skin grafts, local tissue flaps, or free flaps for reconstruction. Skin grafts involve taking healthy skin from another part of the body to cover the wound, but they might not be as durable in the long term. Local or distant flaps are often preferred because they provide better long-term results and lower chances of permanent tightening of the skin. Reconstruction should focus on maintaining the foot's form, function, and appearance. If you have sustained such an injury, it is suggested that you schedule an appointment with a podiatrist for individualized treatment to achieve the best outcome.

Wound care is an important part in dealing with diabetes. If you have diabetes and a foot wound or would like more information about wound care for diabetics, consult with Dr. Christine Quinn from New Jersey. Our doctor will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment.

What Is Wound Care?

Wound care is the practice of taking proper care of a wound. This can range from the smallest to the largest of wounds. While everyone can benefit from proper wound care, it is much more important for diabetics. Diabetics often suffer from poor blood circulation which causes wounds to heal much slower than they would in a non-diabetic. 

What Is the Importance of Wound Care?

While it may not seem apparent with small ulcers on the foot, for diabetics, any size ulcer can become infected. Diabetics often also suffer from neuropathy, or nerve loss. This means they might not even feel when they have an ulcer on their foot. If the wound becomes severely infected, amputation may be necessary. Therefore, it is of the upmost importance to properly care for any and all foot wounds.

How to Care for Wounds

The best way to care for foot wounds is to prevent them. For diabetics, this means daily inspections of the feet for any signs of abnormalities or ulcers. It is also recommended to see a podiatrist several times a year for a foot inspection. If you do have an ulcer, run the wound under water to clear dirt from the wound; then apply antibiotic ointment to the wound and cover with a bandage. Bandages should be changed daily and keeping pressure off the wound is smart. It is advised to see a podiatrist, who can keep an eye on it.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Basking Ridge, NJ, near Warren, Stirling, and Bedminster . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

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